Kanji Test

Good morning everyone,

About the weather...it's still awesome! And it's going to be awesome for at least one more week as there is no change in the forecast anytime soon.

Japan’s national flag may be well-known for its simplicity—after all it’s just a big red circle in the middle of a field of white—but of course it's not the only flag in Japan. Just like back home, every single prefecture, city, town and village has its own special flag to represent its history or what it’s famous for.

Actually, a lot of the municipalities’ flags have stylized versions of the kanji found in their names. And when we say stylized, we mean highly stylized. We have here a selection of some of Japan’s kanji-flags, so you can see the creativity that went into each of them.

If you think you’re a kanji master, then get ready to test your skills and see how many you can guess correctly!

If you're up for a challenge feel free to try to guess what the flags are based off before you scroll down, but otherwise just enjoy the cleverness that went into some of these designs.

We’ll start off with some easy ones, just to warm up.

▼ Here’s the flag for Shinagawa, Tokyo. What kanji is stylized here?

kanji flag (11)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 品 (shina, “goods”) in 品川 (Shinagawa) of course. Even me, someone who never studies kanji could easily guess this one.

kanji flag (10)

▼ Next up, the flag for Akita City. What kanji could this be based on?

kanji flag (1)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 田 (ta, “rice field”) in 秋田 (Akita). They rounded the edges a bit, but still this one is pretty easy to imagine.

kanji flag (2)

▼ Here’s the flag for Fukyama City in Hiroshima. What kanji do you think this is?

kanji flag (3)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 山 (yama, “mountain”) in 福山 (Fukuyama). Apparently it was stylized to look like a bat due to Fukuyama Castle being on what is known as Bat Mountain. Another pretty easy one to guess, and it looks pretty close to the Batman symbol...

kanji flag (4)

▼ How about this flag for Tama City in Tokyo? What kanji is this?

kanji flag (12)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 多 (ta, “many”) in 多摩 (Tama). I could actually get this one easily, even though it kind of looks like a bird flying away if you're not looking for the kanji...

kanji flag (11)

▼ Next up is this nice one from Kanazawa City in Ishikawa Prefecture. This one might look hard, but it’s not too difficult to guess.

kanji flag (5)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 金 (kana, “gold”) in 金沢 (Kanazawa). This was the last one I could get. I know the kanji for gold, so it was pretty easy to see. Kind of looks like a crab to me, but to each their own.

kanji flag (6)

▼ Now this is where things start to get a little weird. Can you guess the kanji for Beppu City in Oita Prefecture?

kanji flag (2)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 別 (be, “separate”) in 別府 (Beppu). Things are starting to get a little too curvy for my brain to read.

kanji flag (3)

▼ How about this oddly symmetrical kanji for Kitami City in Hokkaido?

kanji flag (7)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 北 (kita, “north”) in 北見 (Kitami). I have a feeling I’d fail my kanji test if I wrote it like that.

kanji flag (8)

▼ And now we get into crazy mode. What kanji is on the flag here for Ome City in Tokyo?

kanji flag (8)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 青 (o, “blue”) in 青梅 (Ome). I mean, I can kind of see it. I think….

kanji flag (9)

▼ How about the flag for Shibuya in Tokyo? Can you figure out the kanji here?

kanji flag (10)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 渋 (shibu, “elegant”) in 渋谷 (Shibuya). Yeah, sure, if you say so!

kanji flag (9)

▼ Is… is that even real? What the heck is going on here with the flag for Azumino City in Nagano?

kanji flag (1)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 安 (a, “safe”) in 安曇野 (Azumino). I…Really?! It kind of looks like a ballerina to me...

kanji flag (12)

▼ Good luck on this one! Try to guess the kanji for Kasuga City in Fukuoka.

kanji flag (6)

.

▼ Answer: This is the 春 (kasu, “spring”) in 春日 (Kasuga). There was a time when I thought I knew how to read kanji….

kanji flag (7)

▼ And the last one: the flag for Ibaraki City in Osaka. I’ll give you a hint: it’s not the kanji for “bird.”

kanji flag (4).

▼ Answer: This is the 茨 (iba, “thorn bush”) in 茨城 (Ibaraki). Oh… yeah. I can totally see it now.

kanji flag (5)

So how many did you get right? I think the first four or so were pretty easy. After that, I think someone just made a picture and then tried to say that it was based on kanji, but actually had no connection whatsoever...ha ha!

Have a great day!


Post a comment

Private comment

最新記事
最新コメント
最新トラックバック
月別アーカイブ
カテゴリ
Visitors
検索フォーム
リンク
QRコード
QRコード
RSSリンクの表示