Good morning everyone,

It looks like I'll be continuing to eat ice cream every day for at least another week as daytime highs are expected to be 34C or higher for at least another 7 days! What if August is hotter than July?! I probably won't survive to see September...ha ha!

Although it’s still a little way off before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, organizers are hard at work with events like famous anime characters being chosen as official ambassadors. And one event that does have to be planned far in advance is the torch relay.

Historically, a torch relay performed by outstanding athletes have always preceded the Games, carrying with it the hopes, dreams, and aspirations of many. And for the upcoming 2020 Tokyo Olympics, there’s no better spot to kick off this symbolic relay than in one of the places most affected by the catastrophic Tohoku earthquake back in 2011: Fukushima Prefecture. The relay’s concept is “Hope lights our way.”

Announced on 12 July by The Tokyo Organising Committee of the Olympic and Paralympic Games, the torch is set to depart from Fukushima on 26 March 2020 and tour all of Japan’s 47 prefectures over 121 days before ending its journey in Tokyo.

olympic relay map

The torch relay focuses on the theme of restoration, with special routes planned to carefully weave the “Flames of Restoration” through the three prefectures most affected by the devastating earthquake: Fukushima, Iwate, and Miyagi. The torch will spend three days at each of these prefectures, longer than most others.

Not only does the relay represent an entire country’s effort in overcoming all odds with an indomitable spirit, it’s also a big thank you to all the incredible support from everyone who helped Japan regain its footing after a crippling disaster.

Come 2020, it would be a good ten years since the fateful earthquake. Although some may never fully recover from the scars, the sight of the Olympic torch burning bright might just light the way home for those who spirits are still lost at sea.

What do you think of the plan? I like it. Sometimes I think the government is trying way too hard to show that Fukushima is safe (parts of it are, but parts of it won't be for hundreds of years or more), but Fukushima was hard hit by the tsunami and could use some extra support.

Have a great day!


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